understanding the importance and impact of anonymity and authentication in a networked society
navigation menu top border

.:home:.     .:project:.    .:people:.     .:research:.     .:blog:.     .:resources:.     .:media:.

navigation menu bottom border
main display area top border

FINAL CALL FOR STUDENT ABSTRACTS

posted by:Julia Ladouceur // 09:41 AM // June 20, 2007 // Student I

FINAL CALL FOR STUDENT ABSTRACTS
The Student "I": A student conference on privacy and identity
University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law
October 25, 2007

Graduate and undergraduate students from all disciplines are invited to submit an abstract for The Student “I”, a student conference on October 25, 2007 at the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, Canada.

Preceding the Revealed “I” conference hosted by researchers from On the Identity Trail, this day long student conference brings together students from around the world, selected through a peer-review process, to present research relating to identity, privacy, anonymity, technology, surveillance, and other related topics engaged by the On the Identity Trail project.

Abstracts should not exceed 1,000 words (including notes and citations). Successful abstracts will seek to make an original contribution. Inter-disciplinary submissions are encouraged. Abstracts should be accompanied with a short bio, which should include the student’s program and institution of study, and an email address for correspondence. The deadline for abstracts is July 1, 2007. Send to:

Julia Ladouceur
University of Ottawa
Faculty of Law, Common Law Section
57 Louis Pasteur Street
Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5
Email: anonplan@uottawa.ca

Successful applicants will be notified at the email address provided no later than August 1, 2007. Successful applicants who are unable to obtain funding from their home institution may apply for a student bursary to cover expenses relating to travel and accommodation.

| Comments (0) |


main display area bottom border

.:privacy:. | .:contact:.


This is a SSHRC funded project:
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada